Clothing

Personal preference is a big factor here, but here are some of my thoughts. See my Gear page for related comments, my clothing list, and supplier listings.

New Zealand Conditions

Weight is a big issue on a long hike and you may wish to swap your usual hiking clothes for lighter ones. But consider also New Zealand conditions, and especially the South Island, where the Te Araroa Trail is more rugged than the North Island section. If you come from overseas you will notice New Zealanders tend to wear heavy boots, gaiters, shorts, heavy Gore-tex rain gear and sturdy packs. There is a reason for this. As noted in the Weather & Hazards pages, New Zealand has a rainy, windy and very changeable climate. Tracks can be muddy at any time of year. Sharp scree can shred lightweight footwear. Dense bush can tear at packs and other gear, especially the sharp thorns of the aptly named bush lawyer vine, and in non-forested country there is the spiny matagouri shrub. And rainstorms with freezing winds can blow though at any time of year. The rough conditions of hiking in NZ are suggested by the use of terms like ‘track’ rather than ‘trail’, ‘tramping’ instead of ‘hiking’ and bush (in the sense of jungle) rather than ‘forest’. However, you do need to save weight. So a compromise has to be reached where you accept that your gear might get trashed, and you will be less comfortable wearing or using it, but your pack is lighter.

Rain Gear

Not only can it be rainy and windy in NZ, but chances are you will experience both conditions simultaneously. There’s nothing like a long length Gortex or similar fabric parka for keeping you comfortable and dry in these situations. The sort that extend well down the thigh are available at Macpac (as the Resolution XPD, 660g, possibly being discontinued) and Earth Sea and Sky (Hydrophobia, 750g). This sort of parka could literally save your life in really severe conditions. However, they are heavy, so you need to make a call on that. The ultralight Outdoor Research Helium II (180g) might keep you dry up to a point, but not warm, and it doesn’t go much below the waist. Maybe a solution to the rain gear weight issue is simply to spend a lot of time checking weather forecasts and not going out when it is going to be raining heavily.

Tops

It is worth always having a spare that will be dry to put on in the hut or at camp, and clean enough to sleep in. Many people choose merino wool for tops these days, though they are expensive, even in the land of sheep. Merino does have the great advantage of not smelling after days of wear, and it is warm when wet (including simply with sweat). But it can be heavier than synthetic material, and personally I find it scratchy on the skin (no matter how fine and regardless of itch-free claims) as well as suffocating when hot. However,  a synthetic fibre blended in can make all the difference, though it can be hard to find such garments. Macpac, Kathmandu and even Icebreaker have all made such blends, but their commitment to continuing production on each model has been shaky.

Bottoms

The classic Kiwi tramping outfit is shorts over longjohns and a longjohn top. It gives you freedom of movement, keeps you warm, and is reasonably comfortable to walk in when it’s raining. Many overseas hikers seem to wear long pants however. I’m not clear why this is, but I don’t think they are a good idea in NZ conditions. They can be hot to walk in, get muddy or torn easily, and are very unpleasant to wear when wet. A few minutes walking through wet tussock or ferns will leave your trousers soaking.

However, long pants are nice to wear around camp (especially when windy or cold),  keep off the sandflies, prevent sunburn, and are handy for looking respectable in town. I like to take some super light ones.

Feet and Legs

It’s good to carry a clean pair of socks you can always rely on to sleep in. And to be dry to wear in the hut. There are a lot of stream crossings on the trail, so you will often finish your day with wet socks. There are waterproof socks, but they are expensive and I’m not sure how they perform. A light-weight inner pair of socks can help prevent blisters, as can socks with toes, such as those made by Ininji or Barefootinc.

Gaiters keep twigs and stones out of your shoes/boots, bidi-bids and other hooked seeds off your socks and legs, protect your legs from abrasions, stop dust on country roads from making your legs and socks filthy, or mud in the bush doing likewise, as well as help keep your feet dry. With gaiters you can cross many a stream without water getting into your boots if you scamper across quickly enough. As noted above, they are popular with serious NZ trampers, but less commonly worn by people on the TA.

Footwear

The big question is whether to go for full tramping boots or trail runners. The latter are popular for through-hiking in the USA. There is a claim that each kg on your feet is equivalent to 5 kg in your pack in terms of energy requirement on you. So light weight on your feet means you can travel further. Boots are said to give more ankle support, which becomes increasingly important the more you are carrying on your back, as this makes you unstable. They are usually far more durable than trail runners (an important consideration in NZ’s rough conditions, especially when it comes to scree slopes), and more waterproof. Trail runner fans argue that waterproof claims for boots are largely fiction, and if you get your trail runners wet they soon dry, unlike boots. As for durability, well you just buy a new pair when they wear out. But once you are north of Wanaka on the TA South Island you will have to go well off-trail (to Christchurch probably) to buy replacements, and what happens if the sole simply comes apart when you are miles from anywhere?

I bought some Keen Targhee Mid boots as a compromise between the two camps. Their toe box room is fantastic and they are a relatively light weight boot. But half way through the hike I was seriously worried whether they would last the distance and at the end they were only suitable for the rubbish bin. Claims of waterproofness didn’t stack up either. Sure, you might be able to splash through a couple of streams without water coming in, but not half a dozen in a row. Just walking for an hour in long wet grass gave me wet feet.

Consider buying some good insoles for better cushioning and arch support. Most of those that come with shoes or boots – even expensive one – are rubbish.

And if you have suffered foot pain on previous hikes there is a good chance this will be magnified on a long hike like the TA. See a podiatrist or sports doctor before you buy footwear. Likewise see a physiotherapist or sports doctor if you have had knee pain or other joint and muscle issues. Again, minor complaints in other circumstances can turn into a show stopper on the TA. I often had days where I would have some heel pain before doing the TA, especially just when getting up in the morning, or after a long day, but I never thought much of it. By day 32 on the trail the pain was severe and I was wondering if I would be able to finish the South Island. An internet self-diagnosis suggested plantar fasciitis and I got a friend to send me some heel gels, which helped a bit. Once back home a visit to the podiatrist resulted in orthotics and buying walking shoes (Hokas) with a very stiff last (sole) and lots of cushioning. Problem solved.