Food

Food is largely a matter of personal choice, but here are a few of my choices:

Protein

proteinConsider vegetable protein powder. It is expensive, but light. Your body will be trying to build up muscle during the trek, and usual protein sources like meat, fish, eggs and beans are either impractical or heavy. I mix protein powder with my morning muesli. I prefer vegetable rather than milk whey protein because it mixes with water more easily and doesn’t have a greasy texture and taste. Plus it comes from a more environmentally friendly and ethical source. You can buy it at health food stores and body building shops.

And don’t forget the protein value of nuts besides their slow-burn energy value. They are also expensive, but are filling and convenient to eat.

Vegetables and Carbohydrate

mashed-potatoes-and-peas-close-upVegetables are another thing that are heavy and largely impractical to carry. Dried peas fill some of the gap. You don’t have to boil them – just bring to the boil and let stand. Unfortunately dried mixed vegetables no longer seem to be available on supermarket shelves but you may be able to improvise from an Indian food store. If you have a taste for dried seaweed then this is another form of vegetable, and is very light weight. Asian stores or Asian food sections of the larger supermarkets are the place to find it.

Dried potato is a great source of carbohydrate bulk. It is light, cheap, and easily prepared. It can even be mixed and eaten cold. The Maggi version is more tasty than the plain packets found in the larger supermarkets, though more expensive. And you can now buy dehydrated kumara (sweet potato) in supermarkets. Delicious! But has a very high sugar content and is not as cheap as potato. Couscous is the other all-purpose carbohydrate, though heavier.

Wraps and tortillas are becoming popular as a bread substitute. They last quite well, are compact, and can slide down the back of a pack without getting crushed.

Dehydrated Meals

backcountry-cuisine-1

You can always make your own dehydrated meals, but it saves a lot of time to just buy them. They are expensive, so best to stock up when there are sales. Backcountry Cuisine meals are sold in all outdoor supply stores, as well as in supermarkets in centres for outdoor activities such as Te Anau and Wanaka. I prefer the 2-serving size as the singles just aren’t big enough after an eight hour walk. But sometimes I bulk the singles (or even the doubles) out with dried peas, couscous or potato. A new, slightly cheaper, manufacturer is Absolute Wilderness, who vacuum-pack their meals, saving a lot of bulk. There are not many retailers selling their products yet, but there are stockists in Invercargill, Queenstown and Wanaka on your route (see the Absolute Wilderness website for details). You can mail order from them too. Note that nearly all their meals are only 90-100g single serves.

Fat

Another food type that’s hard to get when hiking is fat. Some people take a bottle of olive oil, but a (plastic) jar of peanut butter is maybe as good and less messy.  No need to spread it on anything, just eat from the jar. Though given that the quality brands of peanut butter are simply made from ground nuts, you could always just take peanuts and avoid the bulk of a jar and the risk of the oil running out and ruining things. Not quite as good as comfort food on a rainy day in a hut or tent as a jar of peanut butter though.

Supply Drops

postage-bagNow, many of the above items (excepting chocolate and wraps) can be hard to come by in the grocery stores of small settlements. Don’t expect bulk bins of nuts and dried fruit, for example: you will have to buy expensive pre-packed versions. So that’s where food boxes (aka bounce boxes) come in. You package up the things you think you will need and mail them to your anticipated accommodation. Hostels will generally accept them with no problems, but you should check with other types of accommodation at the time you make a booking, and to confirm their mailing address, which in a few cases is different from their physical address. One or two will charge a fee. Obviously if you send a package to an accommodation you are expected to stay there. And don’t forget to put a date of expected arrival on it, so the people can make a decision on when to throw it away if you don’t turn up. If you don’t know where you are going to be staying then you can send it to ‘Post Restante’ at a post office in the larger towns, but remember to consider whether the post office will be open at the time and day you want to collect it.

The term bounce box comes from the concept of using the same box and filling it up at a given town, mailing it to the next, and repeating down the trail. So you could keep sending ahead stuff you may or may not need, like a spare pair of shoes, warm clothes, tent repair materials, until you do need them. Or you can estimate when you will need everything and send the lot out in advance.

You don’t have to send an actual box of course. The prepaid plastic envelopes sold at NZ Post shops (see picture above) are very strong and a cheaper method, though you might want to include an inner bag in case the outer one breaks. Or put a box inside of one. Maximum weight is 3kg. You can’t send gas canisters of course.

Cooking

Which leads me to cooking. To save weight on fuel I prefer foods that don’t need actual cooking, just the addition of boiling water. Many that claim they need cooking, like 2 minute noodles or dried peas, are fine with a bit of time in hot water. You can wrap the cooking pot in something insulating after it has boiled to keep the cooking process going longer too. Some people make fitted cosies out of silvered and insulating car sunshades for this purpose. See the Gear page for more on cooking stoves.

A few hardy types don’t cook at all. Soaking peas, noodles, etc for several hours in cold water yields pretty much the same result as a quick boil. You can carry a container of soaking dinner while you walk but I would have thought the weight advantage of not carrying a stove and fuel is then counterbalanced by carrying rehydrating food. Also, cooking can increase the digestible percentage of a food (especially starch), which is one of the reasons why the discovery of fire gave our ancestors an evolutionary advantage.

Nutrition

Lastly, there is the matter of good nutrition. You are going to be putting your body through more than it normally has to deal with, and your food options are going to be severely compromised. I take multivitamins with me, and when I get to a settlement, eat fresh food, including lots of vegetables and protein. Nutritionally sparse belly fillers like instant noodles are best left for the trail. You will also be burning up more energy than usual, so make sure you eat more than you normally would. Most people will lose a good deal of weight on the TA, which can be useful if you are a little heavy, as you will have less body load to carry. But it could be an endurance disadvantage for slimmer people if they lose their usual energy reserves stored in fat.

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